Alkabez, Solomon ben-Moses ha-Levi

(c. 1505–76)
   Spanish Cabbalist and mystic poet. In 1529 Alkabez, who was born in Spain, decided to emigrate to Palestine and on his journey met Joseph CARO, the author of the code known as Shulchan Aruch, and stayed with him in Nikopolis. About 1535, Alkabez left for Safad, a town in northern Galilee. Here he may have officiated as a rabbi, since this town was particularly revered as a centre of scholarship. It is also suggested that Alkabez may have been head of the talmudic academy in neighbouring Meron.
   Alkabez was a prolific author, especially of Hebrew verse, and he is particularly remembered for the extremely popular hymn addressed to the Divine Presence, Lechah Dodi (‘Come My Beloved’), sung on the Sabbath eve. It was incorporated in the prayer book from 1584.

Who’s Who in Jewish History after the period of the Old Testament. . 2012.

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